Microsoft’s new Surface Pro has an unexpected hibernation problem

Despite the good reception of the Surface Pro (2017), Microsoft appears to be contractually incapable of releasing a Surface without a sleep-related issue, and the new Surface Pro 2017 is no exception to that rule.
We previously became aware of a small number of users who reported Surface sleep issues just 5 days after the device became available, with the device going to sleep while in use – resulting in lost work and user frustration.
In a statement on the Microsoft thread, a Microsoft rep noted “We are aware of a small group of customers reporting a scenario with their new Surface Pro in which the device inadvertently hibernates. We are investigating this issue.”
A moderator on the sub (MVP Barb Bowman) who helped grateful users deal with the Surface Pro 3 and Surface Pro 4 battery issues has issued her own unofficial advice, users who have this issue should return their device as soon as possible for a refund or replacement.
So, in my OPINION, based on the fact that it has historically taken Microsoft months and months to identify issues and come out with a fix and since these devices are still eligible for return for full refund, you may want to consider returning for a full refund and repurchasing. If you do that, you get another 30 days of being able to return and repurchase, etc. The reason I say this is that 6 months down the road, Microsoft will exchange for a refurb if they determine it is a hardware issue and the quality of the refurbs has not been consistent.
Additionally, if it IS a software issue, customers should not need to perform multiple wipes and reimages and bare metal troubleshooting. These devices should just work properly out of the box.
I’m not trying to be deliberately negative, but the track record Microsoft has of fixing issues is slow. You’ve all spent a lot of money. Sure it costs in time to set up a new Surface, but if the advice is to wipe and reload a device that has this issue, in MY opinion, it’s best to spend the time doing this with a different, new Surface Pro in case it is a hardware issue.
Microsoft’s Surfaces have been prone to hardware issues as noted above, and the firm has been equally slow to issue fixes, with the Surface Pro 4 only being fixed after half a year of issues, and the Surface Pro 3 getting a 1-2 punch of consecutive battery issues.  These devices are expensive, starting from just under £1000 and going over £2000, issues like these are not expected for the exorbitant prices – especially since other OEMs offer similarly specced, more reliable devices for lower prices.
Previously, the issues with the Surface Book and Surface Pro 4 were attributed to the Skylake platform (despite no other Windows PCs exhibiting this in any significant numbers), with the Surface Pro experiencing this issue as well, perhaps Microsoft needs to take a harder look at its quality control department.
We have reached out to Microsoft for comment and will update this article if we receive a response.

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